Zebra

Second Grevy’s Zebra of the Season for Chester Zoo

1_A baby zebra caught visitors to Chester Zoo by surprise after it was born in front of them. The foal was born to mum Nadine.  (7)

A baby Grevy’s Zebra caught Chester Zoo visitors by surprise after it was born before their eyes, on August 21.

The latest arrival to the Zoo’s herd of endangered Grevy’s Zebras arrived to mum, Nadine, and dad, Mac. The foal is the second to be born at the Zoo in the space of just six days!

After a 14-month-long gestation, zookeepers noticed that Nadine was showing signs of labor early on the afternoon of August 21. They carefully monitored the momentous event from a distance, and Nadine gave birth after 40 minutes, in front of astounded onlookers.

Video footage, taken by a visitor, shows Nadine rolling around on her side before getting to her feet and starting to deliver the youngster.

Kim Wood, assistant team manager at the zoo, said, “Nadine gave birth in the middle of the afternoon in front of a group of some pretty amazed visitors.

“At first Nadine was seen lying on her side trying to make herself more comfortable as she began to feel what was about to happen. She then got to her feet and picked her spot in the paddock, and a healthy youngster appeared less than an hour later. It was a really smooth delivery.

“The foal is looking great and, with it being the second to be born here in the space of just a week, we’re sure the two new arrivals will be as thick as thieves.”

2_A baby zebra caught visitors to Chester Zoo by surprise after it was born in front of them. The foal was born to mum Nadine.  (6)

3_A baby zebra caught visitors to Chester Zoo by surprise after it was born in front of them. The foal was born to mum Nadine.  (63)

4_A baby zebra caught visitors to Chester Zoo by surprise after it was born in front of them. The foal was born to mum Nadine.  (58)Photo Credits: Chester Zoo

 

Nadine’s new offspring increases the number of Grevy’s Zebra, at Chester Zoo, to a herd of six. Keepers have yet to choose a name for the new arrival, as they have not yet been able to determine the sex.

Continue reading "Second Grevy’s Zebra of the Season for Chester Zoo " »


Endangered Zebra Filly Born at Toronto Zoo

1_TZ_GrevysZebraFoal_Photo Credit - C.Thompson, Toronto Zoo - 4

The Toronto Zoo is pleased to announce that Tori, a six-year-old female Grevy's Zebra, gave birth to a filly on July 26. This birth is important for Grevy's Zebra conservation, as the species is currently listed as “Endangered” on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. According to estimates, there are about 2,000 left in the wild.

This is the second filly Tori has given birth to at the Toronto Zoo (the first being Leia, in January of 2014, with sire Jake). The new little filly began to walk ten minutes after she was born, which is an important milestone in her development. Both mom and filly are doing well, and she is already starting to develop her own strong and confident personality, according to her Zoo Keepers.

2_TZ_GrevysZebraFoal_Photo Credit - C.Thompson, Toronto Zoo - 6

3_TZ_GrevysZebraFoal_Photo Credit - C.Thompson, Toronto Zoo - 2

4_TZ_GrevysZebraFoal_Photo Credit - K.Haider, Toronto Zoo - 4Photo Credits: C. Thompson/ Toronto Zoo

Grevy's Zebras (Equus grevyi) were first put on the IUCN list in 1986, after their population began to decline due to over hunting in the late 1970s. Today, Grevy's Zebras are primarily found in Kenya and Ethiopia. Over the past 30 years, their global population has declined by approximately 70%. The major threats facing Grevy's Zebras are: loss of grazing habitat, reduced access to available water sources, competition for resources, hunting and disease.

"The birth of Tori's filly is a great opportunity to spread the word on the plight of Grevy's Zebras in the wild," says Maria Franke, Curator of Mammals, Toronto Zoo. "As one of the Zoo's key mandates is to educate visitors on current conservation issues and help preserve biodiversity, this filly helps highlight the importance of zebra conservation and what is being done to preserve this magnificent species in Africa. The Toronto Zoo supports Grevy's Zebra conservation efforts in Ethiopia and Kenya, through the Toronto Zoo Endangered Species Reserve Fund."

The Toronto Zoo’s Endangered Species Reserve Fund supports Canadian species and other critical projects around the world, further emphasizing our ongoing commitment to fight extinction. Every animal at the Zoo is an ambassador for its counterpart in the wild, and each animal strives to create a connection with the public to bring attention to the problems facing species in the wild. The Toronto Zoo believes it has a shared responsibility to care for wildlife on this planet, and the Zoo works hard to be a leader in efforts to save animals and habitats that need help.

The Toronto Zoo is also part of the Grevy's Zebra Species Survival Plan (SSP), which is a series of long-term breeding and conservation plans that act as an insurance policy fighting against extinction to save endangered species. These plans focus on maintaining genetically healthy captive populations and conservation efforts in the wild. Now, more than ever, the work the Toronto Zoo does to save and protect species and their habitats is critical to the ongoing survival of many of the worlds’ most endangered species, including the Grevy's Zebra.

Continue reading "Endangered Zebra Filly Born at Toronto Zoo " »


Rare Zebra Foal Earns Its Stripes

Adorable one-day-old zebra foal born at Chester Zoo to mum, Flo.  (50)
In the early hours of August 15, Flo, a Grevy’s Zebra, gave birth to a brand-new member of this endangered species at the Chester Zoo.

Within an hour of birth, the foal was standing and nursing.  Then, after a few stumbles, the skinny youngster figured out how to maneuver its long, striped legs and began running.  Keepers don’t know the foal’s gender, so they have not yet chosen a name. The foal currently has brown stripes, but they’ll eventually turn black as the foal matures.

Adorable one-day-old zebra foal born at Chester Zoo to mum, Flo.  (39)
Adorable one-day-old zebra foal born at Chester Zoo to mum, Flo.  (41)Photo Credit:  Chester Zoo
 
Grevy’s Zebras are the largest and most endangered of the world’s three remaining Zebra species, and they are found only in isolated areas of Ethiopia and Northern Kenya.  

Grevy’s Zebra populations have fallen by 85% in the last 30 years, and experts estimate that as few as 1,900 individuals remain in the wild.  The decline is attributed to a reduction of water sources, habitat loss, hunting, and disease. The species has disappeared across most of its range and is already extinct in Somalia and Sudan. The International Union for Conservation of Nature lists the Grevy’s Zebra as Endangered.

The Chester Zoo’s new foal will be an important addition to the species’ breeding program.

See more photos of the new foal below.

Continue reading "Rare Zebra Foal Earns Its Stripes" »


Third Zebra Birth of the Year at BIOPARC Valencia

1_3 cría de cebra nacida en BIOPARC Valencia este año - agosto 2016 (10)

BIOPARC Valencia recently welcomed their third Grant’s Zebra foal of this year!

This season’s “baby boom” started with the birth of a filly on June 7. There is no word yet on the sex of the park’s newest addition.

2_3 cría de cebra nacida en BIOPARC Valencia este año - agosto 2016 (2)

3_3 crías de cebra nacidas este año en BIOPARC Valencia 2016

4_3 crías de cebra nacidas este año en BIOPARC Valencia 2016 (3)Photo Credits: BIOPARC Valencia

 

Grant's Zebra (Equus quagga boehmi) is the smallest of six subspecies of the Plains Zebra. This subspecies represents the Zebra form of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem.

The distribution of this subspecies is in Zambia, west of the Luangwa River and west to Kariba, Shaba Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, north to the Kibanzao Plateau. In Tanzania, north from Nyangaui and Kibwezi into southwestern Kenya as far as Sotik. It can also be found in eastern Kenya and east of the Great Rift Valley into southernmost Ethiopia. It also occurs as far as the Juba River in Somalia.

This northern subspecies is vertically striped in front, horizontally on the back legs, and diagonally on the rump and hind flanks. Northerly specimens may lack a mane. Grant’s Zebras grow to be about 120 to 140 centimeters (3.9 to 4.6 ft) tall, and generally weigh about 300 kilograms (660 lb). Zebras live in family groups of up to 17 or 18 individuals. They live an average of 20 years.

Needing water daily, they remain no more than half a day's walk from water sources. Their diet includes grass, tough stems, and sometimes leaves or barks of trees and shrubs. They require a lot of food so it is not uncommon for them to spend around 20 hours a day grazing.

Continue reading "Third Zebra Birth of the Year at BIOPARC Valencia " »


Second Zebra Foal for Taronga Western Plains Zoo

1_IMG_1029

Keepers at Taronga Western Plains Zoo are excited by the arrival of their second Zebra foal in the past month. The female foal, which was born in the early hours of July 30, has been named Zina (free spirit in Swahili).

Zina is the fifth foal for experienced mother, Kijani. “Both mother and foal are doing really well, which is to be expected from an experienced mother like Kijani,” said Keeper, Carolene Magner.

2_IMG_0774

3_IMG_0772

4_IMG_0770Photo Credits: Taronga Western Plains Zoo

Zina, out on exhibit with her mother and the rest of the herd, is very calm and taking everything in her stride.

“Zina is staying close by her mother’s side at present but does enjoy a gallop around the paddock in the morning. Zina is a large foal in comparison to Khari, who was born a month ago, they are relatively the same size.”

“It is great to see the herd continuing to grow, and as the two foals get older, they will start to interact more together,” said Carolene.

There are now three generations of Plains Zebra on exhibit at Taronga Western Plains Zoo, with more foals expected later this year. This most recent arrival brings the total number in the breeding herd to nine.

Continue reading "Second Zebra Foal for Taronga Western Plains Zoo" »


New Zebra for Zoo Basel’s Africa Enclosure

1_13692820_1081756388528767_6629399994531564489_o

Since mid-June, the Africa Enclosure at Basel Zoo has had a new main attraction: a young Grant’s Zebra. Shortly after the birth, the mother and foal headed out into the enclosure with the rest of the herd and have since been delighting the zoo’s visitors.

Basel Zoo’s Africa Enclosure is currently attracting large numbers of visitors. The reason for this is clear: they all want to see the colt Nyati, who was born on June 19th.

This is the fifth foal that the mother Chambura (age 11) has given birth to. The father is Tibor (age 6). Nyati was born in the stall in the early hours of the morning, and a Zookeeper was fortunate enough to observe the birth.

2_13692970_1081756395195433_4505832608631936553_o

3_13662109_1081756411862098_8597396346596946316_o

4_13668837_1081756421862097_8908854090968115986_oPhoto Credits: Zoo Basel

Zebras have a gestation period of one year, and births are relatively swift. While the mother lies on the floor, the rest of the herd stands guard nearby. One extraordinary characteristic is that baby Zebras are extremely active, almost straight after they are born. They stand up after little more than ten minutes, can already start to walk after another twenty minutes and, another ten minutes later, start to gallop. According to Adrian Baumeyer, curator of the Africa Enclosure, this is “vital to the animals’ survival” in the wild.

In the first few days after the birth, the mother generally keeps other members of the herd at a distance, until she has established a strong bond with the foal. On the second day after Nyati’s birth, mother and foal headed out into the enclosure with the rest of the herd. During the first week, this activity was supervised to prevent Nyati falling into the moat while learning to walk.

Foals are suckled for six to eight months. Colts have to leave the herd after one to one-and-a-half years. They are driven away by their father and, in the wild, join a group of bachelors comprising five to ten stallions, in which they remain for three to five years. After this time, the bachelors start to challenge the stallions, which lead a herd with several mares, to an even greater extent. If a stallion shows weakness, it is driven away. A new stallion then takes over the mare herd.

Basel Zoo’s Africa Enclosure is a community enclosure with Zebras, Ostriches and Hippopotamuses. It opened in July 1992. The first animals to move in were a young Hippopotamus pair and a small herd of Zebras. The Ostriches joined these one-year later. During the day, a partition exists between the Zebras and the Ostriches on one side of the enclosure and the Hippopotamuses on the other side, preventing any direct contact between the animals. At night, either the Hippopotamuses or the Zebras can then use the enclosure.

Grant's Zebra (Equus quagga boehmi) is the smallest of six subspecies of the plains Zebra. This subspecies represents the Zebra form of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem.

Zebras are widespread in Eastern Africa. They live in the savannah and open forests. They are highly dependent on water and need to drink almost daily to survive. They primarily feed on grass, leaves and bark. A zebra’s stripe pattern is its most striking feature and as unique as a human fingerprint. The animals use this pattern to recognize each other.


Father’s Day Zebra Birth at Lincoln Park Zoo

1_LPZ160618_701

Father’s Day was celebrated the ‘zoo way’ at Lincoln Park Zoo, with the arrival of a female Grevy’s Zebra foal. It is the first zebra birth at the zoo since 2012.

Animal care staff arrived at about 7 a.m. Saturday, June 18 to find mom and foal standing in the yard together. This is the first offspring for 5-year-old sire, Webster, and the third foal for 9-year-old dam, Adia. Her most recent offspring, Kito, resides in the yard next door.

“We’re thrilled to welcome this new foal to Lincoln Park Zoo,” said Curator Diane Mulkerin “Like all the animals in our care, zebras play an important role in educating our guests about wildlife.”

2_LPZ160618_712

3_LPZ160618_715

4_LPZ160618_717Photo Credits: Todd Rosenberg / Lincoln Park Zoo

The Grevy's Zebra is endangered in the wild due to hunting and habitat loss. Lincoln Park Zoo participates in the Grevy's Zebra Species Survival Plan®, a shared conservation effort by zoos throughout the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. The Grevy's Zebra is native to eastern Africa, where it ranges from Ethiopia to Kenya.

“Research tells us that fostering an emotional connection between humans and animals is key to creating a real commitment to wildlife conservation,” said Lincoln Park Zoo Vice President of Education and Community Engagement Dana Murphy. “Species like zebras, with which we are relatively familiar—and become so at an early age—help us forge that connection and inspire our guests to care about their future.”

Continue reading "Father’s Day Zebra Birth at Lincoln Park Zoo" »


First Zebra of the Season for Bioparc Valencia

1_Primavera 2016 en BIOPARC - La cebra Bom junto a su cría - 7 junio (3)

BIOPARC Valencia recently welcomed their first newborn Grant’s Zebra of this year! On June 7, the Spanish park started the day with the birth of the beautiful filly.

With the arrival of good weather more frequent births of different species occur, and, if all goes well, more births of Zebras are expected at the park. The herd of Zebras, inhabiting the African Savannah exhibit at BIOPARC Valencia, is now composed of one male and four females.

The mother, Bom, arrived at BIOPARC Valencia in June 2007 from Zoo Copenhagen in Denmark. In less than a month, Bom will be 10 years old. The father, Zambé, is the only male of the herd, and he moved to the park, in February 2012 from the Safari de Peaugres in France, for breeding purposes.

The filly is very healthy and constantly follows her attentive and inseparable mother. Both enjoy the sunny spring days with the rest of the Zebra herd and under the curious eyes of the other savannah animals who share their exhibit.

2_Primavera 2016 en BIOPARC - La cebra Bom junto a su cría - 7 junio (4)

3_Primavera 2016 en BIOPARC - potra de cebra con unas horas de vida

4_Primavera 2016 en BIOPARC - las cebras Bom y Zambé junto a su cría - 7 junioPhoto Credits: BIOPARC Valencia

 

Grant's Zebra (Equus quagga boehmi) is the smallest of six subspecies of the Plains Zebra. This subspecies represents the Zebra form of the Serengeti-Mara ecosystem.

The distribution of this subspecies is in Zambia, west of the Luangwa river and west to Kariba, Shaba Province of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, north to the Kibanzao Plateau. In Tanzania, north from Nyangaui and Kibwezi into southwestern Kenya as far as Sotik. It can also be found in eastern Kenya and east of the Great Rift Valley into southernmost Ethiopia. It also occurs as far as the Juba River in Somalia.

This northern subspecies is vertically striped in front, horizontally on the back legs, and diagonally on the rump and hind flanks. Northerly specimens may lack a mane. Grant’s Zebras grow to be about 120 to 140 centimeters (3.9 to 4.6 ft) tall, and generally weigh about 300 kilograms (660 lb). Zebras live in family groups of up to 17 or 18 individuals. They live an average of 20 years.

Needing water daily, they remain no more than half a day's walk from water sources. Their diet includes grass, tough stems, and sometimes leaves or barks of trees and shrubs. They require a lot of food so it is not uncommon for them to spend around 20 hours a day grazing.

Their gestation period is 360-370 days, and they usually have one offspring per birth. The birthing peak is during the rainy season. Mothers nurse their foal for up to a year. Young male Zebras eventually leave their family groups. This is not because of sexual maturity or being kicked out by their fathers, but because their relationship with their mothers has faded after the birth of a sibling. The young stallion then seeks out other young stallions for company. Young females may stay in the harem until they are “abducted” by another stallion.

Continue reading "First Zebra of the Season for Bioparc Valencia" »


Zebra Foal Shows Off Fluffy-Soft Baby Fur

12643018_10153800282957557_8293409184604758255_n

Sporting her fluffy-soft baby fur, Kasema the Zebra foal galloped in the winter sun during her debut at the Berlin Zoo.

12573952_10153800282882557_6921104370357602304_n
12642621_10153800282892557_2038245551640001780_n
1779162_10153800282887557_8363967191392101585_nPhoto Credit:  Zoo Berlin

As Kasema followed her mother Bella’s every move around the exhibit, she displayed a mix of elegance and stumbling, exuberance and caution that is unique to young animals.

Born on January 5, Kasema still has the brownish-striped, fluffy coat of a foal.  As she grows, she will gradually gain the black-and-white stripes of an adult.  Like all foals, she stays close to her mother for protection. 

Kasema and Bella are Grant’s Zebras, also known as Boehm’s Zebras.  They the most common of the six subspecies of Plains Zebra, which are all found in sub-Saharan Africa.  In the wild, they live in small groups called harems, made up of one stallion and up to six mares and their foals.  For now, Grant’s Zebras are widespread and not under significant threat.


Seeing Stripes at Lowry Park Zoo: Zebra Foals Debut

1_Africa Hartmann's mountain zebras Roxie and foal 3 jan 18 2016

On January 15, a Hartmann’s Mountain Zebra gave birth to her first foal -- and the first of her species at Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo. The yet-to-be-named newborn is the second successful zebra foal born at the Zoo in as many months, following the birth of a female Grevy’s Zebra foal this past November 23, 2015.

“We are delighted with this successful birth, a first for Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo. With this foal, the Zoo has now contributed to the managed population of both zebra species in our conservation programs,” said Dr. Larry Killmar, Chief Zoological Officer, Senior Vice President, and Zoo Director.

2_Africa Hartmann's mountain zebras Roxie (mom) and foal 2 jan 19 2016

3_Africa Hartmann's mountain zebras Roxie and foal jan 19 2016

4_Africa Hartmann's mountain zebra foal with giraffes jan 21 2016Photo Credits: Dave Parkinson/Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo

Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo participates in the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) Equid Taxon Advisory Group (TAG), which includes the three main species of zebra: Grevy’s, Mountain and Plains. The program is designed to support conservation of select wildlife species at risk of extinction.

The Zoo is currently home to three Hartmann’s Mountain Zebras: mare--Roxie, sire--Rex, and the newborn female. In keeping with a natural herd structure, mother and baby joined the male on exhibit within a few days and were reunited shortly thereafter with the bachelor herd of giraffes that share their African habitat.

Continue reading "Seeing Stripes at Lowry Park Zoo: Zebra Foals Debut" »