Leopard

Twin Endangered Persian Leopards Born At Dvůr Králové Zoo

Protective first-time mom delays vet checks for a whole month!

It’s been exactly one month since Safari Park Dvůr Králové welcomed the birth of two endangered Persian leopard cubs. The Park is one the world’s most important breeders of the leopard and was responsible for the spread of the species across European zoos. Despite this, it’s been 8 years since the birth of the last cub at Dvůr Králové. The tiny cubs, both male, are extremely valuable for the European breeding program because of the genetic background of their parents. In the last year, cubs of this species have not been born at any other zoos.

SPDK_2022_09_21_Mláďata levharta perského (2)

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Amur Leopard Cubs Now Exploring Their Outdoor Habitat 

On Tuesday, July 12, two 3-month-old Amur leopard cub females, Anya and Irina (pronounced Ah-na and eye-REE-na), were given access for the first time to their outdoor habitat at Big Cat Country at the Saint Louis Zoo. The family has been bonding in a private maternity den since the cubs’ birth, allowing time for the cubs to grow large enough to safely navigate all of the obstacles in the outdoor habitat.  

Amur leopard cub 3 months_615_July 12 2022_credit Robin Winkelman Saint Louis Zoo

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Leopard Cub Zoomies!

Saint Louis Zoo’s feisty, 10-week-old Amur leopard cub twins Irina and Anya got the zoomies! (They are 9 weeks old by the end of this video. They were born April 21, 2022.)

Play is serious business for young cats. These rambunctious games of chase, tag, and hide-and-seek help them practice the skills they will need as adults, such as stalking, pouncing, and socializing.

Amur_leopard_Anya_weighed_veterinary_exam_5.25.22

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Critically Endangered Baby Leopard Gets His Shots And Ventures Out

Like all newborn baby animals, Copenhagen Zoo’s Amur leopard cub must of course also be welcomed with a visit from the vet. Vets check that it is healthy and well, weigh it, check the sex, and give it its own personal chip. The little one did not complain in the slightest, and the patient mother also took it in stride.

About two weeks later, the leopard cub has had its first excursion in the exhibit! It is a seemingly dangerous world, at first! Fortunately, once you get to know it, you quickly become more courageous


Two Amur Leopard Cubs Born At Saint Louis Zoo

Their birth is important for the survival of this critically endangered big cat

(St. Louis, Mo - May 19, 2022) Two critically endangered Amur leopard cubs were born at the Saint Louis Zoo on April 21, 2022. The little females are the first cubs born at the Zoo since 2010 and their births are a significant contribution to the population of Amur leopards in North American zoos. This species is considered one of the most endangered cats in the world.

Amur leopard and cubs_4-29-22_credit Jackie McGarrahan Saint Louis Zoo

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Critically Endangered Amur Leopard Cub Makes Her Debut At Santa Barbara Zoo

This is the first Amur leopard born at the Zoo in over 20 years

(August 11, 2020) Santa Barbara, CA -- On August 6th at 4:05 am, the Santa Barbara Zoo’s Amur leopard, Ajax, gave birth to her first cub. The cub is a female and has been given the name Marta. The cub weighed in at 517 gms (1.1 lbs) at its first medical examination on August 6.

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Ajax and the new cub have remained in their den behind the scenes during their critical bonding period and were not visible to the public for sever months. Once mom and cub bonded and the cub received a clean bill of health, Ajax and the cub began rotating with the father, Kasha, in having access to their exhibit habitat. In the wild, males and females usually do not remain together after breeding occurs, so this separation is important for the safety of Ajax and the cub.

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9-week-old Leopard Gets Vaxxed!

The baby Sri Lankan Leopard at Royal Burgers’ Zoo in The Netherlands has been vaccinated for the second time against cat flu and has been dewormed. Thanks to this booster, the animal is now immune to this common feline disease and hopefully also preventively rid of any worms.

At the age of about three months, the youngster can get acquainted with its mother for the first time in the large outdoor enclosure. Until then, the young can continue to grow in the pleasant warmth of the indoor enclosure thanks to mother's milk.


Sri Lankan Leopard Vaccinated

Monday morning 18 October 2021, Burgers’ Zoo veterinarian Henk Luten vaccinated a six-week-old Sri Lankan leopard against feline panleukopenia and cat flu, dewormed it and microchipped it. The leopard is a female. There are 77 Sri Lankan leopards living in zoos worldwide, 38 males and 39 females. It is estimated that between 200 and 400 leopards still exist in the wild in Sri Lanka.

Enten panterjong 2
Enten panterjong 2

The six-week-old Sri Lankan leopard was touched by human hands for the first time on Monday, 18 October. The cub will receive a second vaccination at the age of about nine weeks, after which it will be immune to feline panleukopenia and cat flu. Not long after the second vaccination, the cub will be introduced to the enclosure for the first time under the watchful eye of its mother.

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Four Furry Featurettes — Cheetah, Tapir, Leopard & Civet Babies

 
Vinnie the Banded Palm Civet
 
Vinnie the Banded Palm Civet was born to a pair of civets living behind the scenes at the Zoo and is just about a month old. Nashville Zoo’s veterinary team is hand-rearing Vinnie. The hope for Vinnie is that he will become an ambassador animal. Civets are nocturnal so Vinnie spends the majority of his day napping. He will be hand-reared until he is fully weaned, and the vet team estimates that it will be in about a month. Full-grown Civets can weigh around 6 pounds. You can come see Vinnie in the window of the neonatal room at Nashville Zoo's HCA Healthcare Veterinary Center.
 
Amur Leopard Cub
 
On August 6th at 4:05 am, the Santa Barbara Zoo’s Amur leopard, Ajax, gave birth to her first cub, and the two are doing well and currently bonding behind the scenes. The cub is a female and has been given the name Marta by her Premier Foster Feeder sponsors, Marta Holsman Babson and Henrietta Holsman Fore. The cub weighed in at 517 gms (1.1 lbs) at its first medical examination on August 6.
This is the first Amur leopard birth at the Santa Barbara Zoo in more than 20 years. Ajax is the most genetically valuable female Amur leopard in North America currently, so this first cub from her will contribute valuable genetics to the population in human care. Amur leopards are the most endangered of all the big cats, with less than 100 remaining in the wild, and the Zoo has been attempting to breed the species for several years now as part of the conservation efforts for this species. This is the fourth litter for Kasha, who arrived at the Zoo in March 2020, just prior to the first coronavirus closure. The pairing of Ajax and Kasha was recommended by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) as part of the Amur Leopard Species Survival Plan (SSP), a program to maintain genetic diversity of threatened and endangered species in human care.
Animal care staff at the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) are hand-raising a male cheetah cub for several weeks before placing the cub with a foster cheetah mother at another zoo. The cub was one of a litter of three born to 7-year-old female Sukiri Sept. 16; the other two cubs were stillborn. Keepers report the cub is strong, active, vocal and eating well. The Cheetah Cub Cam is offline as the cub is no longer in the den.
While Sukiri nursed the surviving cub overnight, providing critical warmth, colostrum and hydration, she started to ignore the cub the morning of Sept. 17. She did not appear agitated when the cub was removed by keepers from her yard later that day and continues to behave and eat normally. Sukiri ate the two stillborn cubs, which is not unusual for a carnivore and in line with wild female cheetah behavior as a dead cub invites predators.
Animal care staff are staying around the clock to feed the cub every 2 to 3 1/2 hours in SCBI’s veterinary hospital. The cub is being fed a formula used successfully to hand-raise cheetah cubs at other zoos. In the coming weeks, a female cheetah at another AZA-accredited zoo is set to give birth. At the recommendation of the SSP, this cub will be introduced to that litter pending any other developments.
SCBI spearheads research programs in Virginia, the Zoo in Washington, D.C., and at field research stations and training sites worldwide. SCBI scientists tackle some of today’s most complex conservation challenges by applying and sharing what they learn about animal behavior and reproduction, ecology, genetics, migration and conservation sustainability.
 
Tapir Calf
 
On Thursday 19th August, Linton Zoo’s female Tapir Tiana gave birth to a healthy female calf after a normal 13-month gestation. We are pleased to say that Mum, Dad and new baby, as yet un-named, are all doing well.
The Brazilian tapir is a large heavily built mammal of a strange prehistoric appearance. The tapir is in fact so well adapted to its environment that it has remained unchanged for about 30 million years. It lives deep in the Brazilian rainforest where, because of the destruction of its habitat and illegal hunting it is has already become extinct in part of its range. The tapir is a shy creature taking to water when threatened where it is able to stay submerged for hours using its long nose to snorkel until such time it feels it is safe to surface. They feed on roots and vegetation but never strip a bush bare of its leaves, zigzagging their way through the undergrowth, conserving the habitat.
Although tapir have survived for millions of years, living in harmony with nature, their future in the wild is by no means secure. A European breeding programme will provide a safeguard against extinction for these wonderful creatures.

Two Amur Leopard Cubs Boost This Rare Species

Cubs newborn pic

Two Amur Leopard cubs born at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo on June 19 had their six-week health checks last week. This was the first time that the care team has handled the cubs, who have been bonding with their mom, Tria, behind the scenes.  The cubs’ father is Rafferty.

Female amur leopard cub 7-31-19

Male cub 7-31-19
Male cub 7-31-19

Amur leopard male getting weighed croppedPhoto Credit (all except top photo): Maria Simmons

Amur Leopards are the most endangered of all big Cats, so this birth is a significant boost for the species. Fewer than 90 individuals remain in the wild in their native habitat in the Amur River Basin in Far East Russia.

The zoo’s care team has been observing the cubs via closed-circuit camera with minimal intervention to allow Tria to care for them undisturbed, and she has proven to be a great mom. Veterinary staff were able to administer the cubs’ 6-week vaccinations during the checkup, as well as weigh them and check their development.  The male weighed 6.2 pounds, and the female weighed 5.6 pounds.

The zoo acquired Tria and Rafferty last year from the Greenville, SC. and San Diego zoos respectively as part of the Species Survival Plan for Amur Leopards.

This species faces extinction because of habitat destruction for logging and farming, overhunting of its prey by humans and illegal poaching for their beautiful coats. Those in the wild are now protected in a preserve established by Russia in 2012, but the wild population is so small that inbreeding has become another threat to the species’ survival.