Lemur

Ring-Tailed Lemur Babies Thriving At Dubbo Zoo           

Taronga Western Plains Zoo’s eight Ring-tailed Lemur babies are now approximately two months of age and becoming very active as they continue to grow and develop.

The babies have started trying solid foods and are becoming very playful. They can often be spotted jumping from one climbing structure to another or playing in the trees together on their island home.

Ring-tailed-Lemur-baby-and-mother

“The babies are starting to eat branches and leaves as well as trying vegetable pieces more and more now. They are still suckling from their mums which is to be expected as most of their nutrition is coming from their mother’s milk,” said Primate keeper, Sasha Brook.

Continue reading "Ring-Tailed Lemur Babies Thriving At Dubbo Zoo           " »


Ring-Tailed Lemur Baby Boom At Dubbo Zoo

Keepers are delighted to announce the safe arrival of eight Ring-tailed Lemur babies to eight different mothers in the breeding group at Taronga Western Plains Zoo, Dubbo.

Image-1-Raki-Baby-by-Sasha-Brook

The new babies are made up of five males and three females and are yet to be named.

“This is the most successful breeding season for our Ring-tailed Lemur breeding group to date,” said Keeper Sasha Brook.

“We have five first-time mothers and three experienced mothers. They are all doing a great job caring for their babies. It’s not uncommon for keepers to see one mother grooming another mother’s baby throughout the day.”

These babies are also the first offspring for new male, Skynard who arrived at Taronga Western Plains Zoo last year. Skynard originated from a Zoo overseas therefore his genetics are incredibly important to the regional breeding program in Australasia.

“These babies are the second generation to be born at Taronga Western Plains Zoo and it is truly wonderful to see some of the first offspring born here now become mothers themselves.”   

“At the moment the infants are clinging to their mum’s bellies and suckling milk but in the coming month they will start to be more active and begin riding on their mother’s backs more and more,” said Sasha.

Ring-tailed Lemurs only have a very small window to fall pregnant. They generally come into season for 24-48 hours once a year, so if there isn’t a successful mating during this period it is a long wait until the following year.

The Ring-tailed Lemur breeding season is generally in March-May, so births are usually expected in early spring following a four-month gestation period.

“The babies are currently a little difficult to see as they are small and clinging to their mum’s tummy but are most active in the mid-morning and mid-afternoon on the island if the weather is warm.”

Taronga Western Plains Zoo is home to two groups of Ring-tailed Lemurs, a breeding group near the Savannah picnic ground and a bachelor group at the Savannah Lake.  The breeding group now has 17 individuals including the most recent babies, whilst the bachelor group has four individuals. 

Taronga Western Plains Zoo will reopen on Monday 18 October 2021. For more information about the Zoo or to purchase tickets visit www.taronga.org.au/dubbo.


Endangered Lemur Born at Belfast Zoo

Northern Ireland’s Belfast Zoo has welcomed several newborns lately including an endangered crowned lemur.

Zoo Manager Alyn Cairns said, “The birth of every species at the zoo here is a joy, but the birth of an endangered species is always extra special. Lemur mothers keep their babies close to their body so we had to wait for a few weeks to go by before we could confirm that the latest arrival is a boy.”

Crowned lemurs are listed as endangered due to habitat loss, mining and logging. They are also hunted for food and the pet trade.

Crowned lemurs originate from the forests of northern Madagascar and get their names from the ‘crown’ marking above their eye line. Females are primarily grey with orange crowns and males are a darker red-brown with black and orange crowns.


Chester Zoo Celebrates Birth Of First Red-Bellied Lemur

Conservationists at Chester Zoo are celebrating the birth of a rare red-bellied lemur - the first of its kind ever to be born at the zoo.

The fluffy youngster, whose sex is currently unknown, arrived to parents Aina (4) and Frej (8) following a 127-day pregnancy.

Chester Zoo celebrates birth of first red-bellied lemur (2)


The new baby was born around six weeks ago but keepers say the precious primate was so small and hidden in among mum’s thick fur that only now is it starting to become more visible. It was estimated to weigh just 70 grams at birth - around the same weight as a banana. 

The birth is an important boost to the European breeding programme for the species with the red-bellied lemur listed as vulnerable to extinction in its native Madagascar – the only place where lemurs are found in the wild.

Experts say destruction of their forest homes, caused by people for agriculture and timber, as well as hunting for their meat has resulted in huge declines for all of the island’s 100 different species of lemur.

Claire Parry, Assistant Team Manager of Primates at Chester Zoo, said:

“The birth of any lemur is real cause for celebration as these primates are vulnerable to extinction in the wild and every new arrival is a vital addition to the endangered species breeding programme. This one, however, is extra special as it’s also the first baby red-bellied lemur ever to be born at Chester Zoo.

“Aina is a first-time mum who’s really taking motherhood in her stride - she’s very confident with her new addition. The baby is always seen clinging on tightly to her, which is exactly what we want to see, and this lovely little lemur looks incredibly content hidden in among mum’s warm fur.”

Mike Jordan, Director of Animal and Plants at the zoo, added:

“With lemurs considered as being the most endangered group of mammals in the world by the IUCN, every birth is significant. Lemurs are endemic to Madagascar where they are severely under threat with over 94% of all lemur populations at risk of disappearing forever. Sadly, we know that many larger lemur species have already become extinct.

“We need to ensure the species that do now remain on this diverse island are safe and protected. That’s why our conservationists have been engaged in protecting habitats and the unique species they are home to in Madagascar for over 10 years now. In 2015, the Malagasy government established The Mangabe New Protected Area, co-managed by our field partner Madagasikara Voakajy and the communities that live in Mangabe itself, providing a safe haven for nine species of lemur, as well as lots of other threatened species. We are fully involved in efforts to prevent their extinction.”


Four Endangered Brothers Born at Jacksonville Zoo

1_brothers Lynded Nunn

Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens is excited about their continued baby boom. They recently announced the birth of four Black and White Ruffed Lemurs on May 19.

This is the third litter for the parents, Hawk and Potter. Their first litter was born at the Jacksonville Zoo in 2015. Keepers were anticipating the birth and had worked with Hawk to allow voluntary sonograms and weight checks.

All four lemur infants are male; a fact that keepers like as this potentially allows the group to stay longer at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens. Female lemur offspring become incompatible with mom around two-years-old.

2_ruffed lemur Lynde Nunn

3_nest box Lynde Nunn

4_Hawk - Lynde NunnPhoto Credits: JZG Senior Mammal Keeper Lynde Nunn

Hawk has again proven herself to be a calm and capable mother with excellent instincts. Black and White Ruffed Lemur mothers do not carry their offspring around. Instead, they build a nest and leave the litter there, returning to nurse. The family will be bonding behind-the-scenes for the immediate future while the infants grow.

Four infants is a lot for any mother, and keepers are encouraging Hawk to eat and drink as much as possible and are supplementing her diet with foods items that support lactation. All of the little guys are nursing well and, because Hawk has such a calm disposition and trust in her keepers, she is allowing care staff to obtain regular weights to confirm their development.

Two of Hawk’s and Potter’s older offspring, a male named Pippen and a female named Frodo, are still at the Zoo and can be seen in a different group, often mixed with other lemur species, in the beautiful African Forest exhibit.

Like all lemurs, Black and White Ruffed Lemurs are native only to the island country of Madagascar. They are classified, by the IUCN, as “Critically Endangered” in the wild due to habitat loss from deforestation. Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens is a part of the Species Survival Plan (SSP), which helps manage the population in AZA accredited facilities.

“We love seeing animal babies and the joy they bring our guests,” said Zoo Executive Director Tony Vecchio, “but seeing four babies, who are so important to their species, born into our new African Forest exhibit is a great feeling for everyone at the Zoo!”


Belfast Zoo Sees Spring Baby Boom

1_Belfast Zoo has successfully bred this endangered species for many years. Visitors can see the new baby in its mountain-top habitat with stunning views across Belfast Lough.

With the start of spring, Belfast Zoo welcomed a Vicuña calf, a Red-backed Bearded Saki, and two White-belted Ruffed Lemur babies.

An adorable baby Vicuña was born on March 27 to mother, Gretchen, and her new mate, Ozzy. The zoo is now home to five Vicuña (Vicugna vicugna), which is a camelid species that originates from mountain and grassland areas of South America. The number of Vicuña living in the wild has decreased due to hunting and habitat destruction, and the species is dependent on breeding programmes to ensure population growth. Belfast Zoo has successfully bred this endangered species for many years. Visitors can see the new baby in its mountaintop habitat, with stunning views across Belfast Lough.

2_The zoo welcomed an adorable baby vicuña on 27 March to mother  Gretchen  and new male  Ozzy

3_Belfast Zoo is one of only two zoos in the UK to care for red-backed sakis  which originate from South America Photo Credits: Belfast Zoo

Zoo primates have also had recent breeding success. A Red-backed Bearded Saki (Chiropotes chiropotes) and two White-belted Ruffed Lemur (Varecia variegata subcincta) babies were born during April. Belfast Zoo is one of only two zoos in the UK to care for Red-backed Sakis, which originate from South America, and it was the first zoo in Europe to breed the species.

White-belted Ruffed Lemurs, from Madagascar, are facing a high risk of extinction in the wild due to habitat loss. Unlike other Lemur species, the baby doesn’t cling to their mother but instead is left to rest in a nearby tree or carried in its mother’s mouth.

Alyn Cairns, Zoo Manager, said, “We are absolutely thrilled with our recent baby boom at Belfast Zoo and hope our visitors will enjoy seeing our newest arrivals.”


Six Baby Lemurs Climb Into View At Chester Zoo

! The first ring-tailed lemurs born in Chester Zoo’s new Madagascar zone cling onto their mums  (22)
Five endangered Ring-tailed Lemur babies - including two sets of twins - and the zoo’s first-ever baby Black Lemur, a species which is Vulnerable to Extinction in the wild in Madagascar, are the latest arrivals at Chester Zoo.

Born between mid-January and early March, each of the babies weighed less than a tennis ball at birth.

The first baby black lemur ever born at Chester Zoo (7)
The first baby black lemur ever born at Chester Zoo (7)Photo Credit: Chester Zoo

Lemurs are born with their adult markings. But because they spend most of their time riding “piggyback” on their mothers, the care team can’t yet tell if the babies are male or female.

Wild Lemurs are found only on the island of Madagascar. As a group, Lemurs are one of the planet’s highest conservation priorities.

Madagascar has already lost up to 90% of its forests, which means that many species living in these environments are now on the brink of extinction.

Dr. Nick Davis, Deputy Curator of Mammals, said, “Madagascar is a truly inspirational place; home to incredible, unique wildlife that cannot be found anywhere else on the planet. Yet we can report first-hand that we are on the brink of losing many of these species forever. Conserving Madagascar’s lemurs is urgent and critical. That’s why any birth is important, but to have six rare baby Lemurs born within weeks of each other is great news for the breeding programme.”

Chester Zoo has been working with Madagasikara Voakajy in the country’s Mangabe New Protected Area, in a bid to save the unique animals that live there.

See more baby Lemur pics below!

Continue reading "Six Baby Lemurs Climb Into View At Chester Zoo" »


Baby Lemur Twins Are Ready For Adventure

Unnamed (1)

Twin Black and White Ruffed Lemurs born on February 19 are ready to explore their world at the United Kingdom’s Dudley Zoo.

Unnamed
Unnamed
Unnamed
Photo Credit: Dudley Zoo

The babies were born to 17-year-old Olivia and her 25-year-old mate, Broom. Since birth, the twins  have been snuggled in their nest box with Olivia. But last week, one of the twins attempted a bold escape from the nest box when Olivia wasn’t looking! A nearby zoo keeper caught the escapade on camera. The babies now regularly explore their indoor habitat under mom's watchful eye. 

The birth of these twins is significant because Black and White Ruffed Lemurs are Critically Endangered according to the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Found only on the island of Madagascar, these Lemurs have experienced a severe decline in population in the last few decades – up to an 80% drop by some estimates. Their large size (compared to other Lemurs) makes then a prime target for poachers and hunters who are trying to feed their families.

Efforts to reintroduce captive-born Lemurs to the wild have been suspended because there is little suitable habitat left for reintroduction. Madagascar’s forests and natural areas have been drastically altered due to human activity, including slash-and-burn agriculture.  


Endangered Crowned Lemur Holds Tight to Mum

1_08_24_CrownedLemurs_SA_6jpg

A Crowned Lemur, born at RZSS Edinburgh Zoo, was recently photographed holding tight to mum, Mabanja. The one-month-old baby will cling to its mother’s back for around four months before becoming more independent.

2_Crowned Lemur

3_Crowned Lemur5

4_Crowned Lemur2Photo Credits: Royal Zoological Society of Scotland (RZSS) 

Crowned Lemurs (Eulemur coronatus) are native to Madagascar. Its diet consists mainly of flowers, fruits, and leaves. Females have a gray body with an orange crown, and males are a darker reddish brown, crowned with black and orange.

They typically give birth late September to early October, after a gestation period of 125 days. They have a life span of approximately 20 years.

The Crowned Lemur is a primate that is primarily diurnal but also has periods of feeding activity at night.

They are currently listed as “Endangered” on the IUCN Red List due to habitat destruction for cultivation, logging and forest fires.

5_Crowned Lemur4

6_Crowned Lemur3


Rare Little Lemur Snuggles Mom at NaturZoo Rheine

1_i kron 2

A rare Crowned Lemur was born at NaturZoo Rheine, Germany on May 7. This is the first time this species has reproduced successfully in this zoo.

The birth took place during daytime within the habitat called “Lemur-Forest”. The exhibit is also home to Ring-tailed Lemurs and Red-bellied Lemurs. All the co-inhabitants were separated to provide the birthing female with the least disturbances as possible. Later, she moved to the indoor-room, where she stayed for a few days to ensure full bonding with her baby and to allow time to get accustomed to her new maternal role. After a week, she was successfully reunited with the male Crowned Lemur and the other species in the exhibit.

2_i kron 8

3_i kron 7

4_i kron 9Photo Credits: NaturZoo Rheine

Crowned Lemurs (Eulemur coronatus) are listed as “Endangered” by the IUCN. In Madagascar they are threatened by habitat destruction and hunting. European Zoos are cooperating within a coordinated breeding-programme (EEP) to maintain an “insurance population” of these lemurs, which in future might provide animals for re-stocking or release in their native range.

There are currently some 80 Crowned Lemurs in European zoos. The baby born at NaturZoo Rheine will contribute to this hopefully growing population.

The sex of the newborn is still unknown, and it might take several more weeks to determine. Male and female Crowned Lemurs are sexually dichromatic, with different pelage coloration especially on the head.

According to staff at NaturZoo Rheine, it doesn’t matter if there is a ‘prince’ or a ‘princess’ in their midst: either would be considered precious like crown-jewels.

5_i kron 10

6_i kron 11

I kron 4